Monthly Archives February 2017

The trouble with intentional teaching

Cultivating good money habits (or any habits) in children requires intentional teaching.  This involves taking the time to explain concepts to the children, asking them questions and getting feedback from them.  It also means looking for opportunities to teach our children good habits.  We have to be more mindful and more observant of the children’s existing habits and behaviour – the good and the bad.  At times, I have found it incredibly frustrating to intentionally observe my children’s existing undesirable
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Why children should ALWAYS have savings goals to work towards

I had a conversation with a friend the other day. She told me her children will not do any housework – not even when she pays them $0.50 for the chores. She explains it’s because $0.50 doesn’t go far these days, there is nothing that a child can buy with such a small amount, so it’s not enough as a motivator. In contrast, my own children often jump at the opportunity to do house work for ANY pay. So it
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Money conversation: profit from division

In an earlier post, I wrote about an experiment I carried out during a recent family holiday. Whilst the experiment didn’t give the result I was hoping for, there was a money lesson in it for my children. My eight-year old wanted chewing gum.  This is not something I approve of, but he got me on a technicality that this is not junk food. He had enough ‘good behaviour’ money to buy a small packet for $2 or a big pack
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9 reasons to pay children to do housework

There are many reasons why parents don’t like to pay their children to do housework. All are valid reasons and each family have their own reasons for paying or not paying their children to do housework.  If you fall into the ‘still not sure camp’ here are nine reasons why you should pay your children to do housework. 1. It teaches them that money doesn’t grow on trees If they want money, they have to earn it by working. Young
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Money conversation: Save on electricity costs on a hot day

We survived a very hot day the other day.  The temperature reached a maximum of 39 degrees celsius (102 Fahrenheit).  Days of extreme heat is when many of our costs spike – the air conditioner is turned on for most of the day.  It is also very tempting to buy take away food or go out to eat. Electricity use is the biggest bug-bear for me.  It is costly, but more importantly, it is also harmful to the environment.  I
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