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Life problem: don’t ask Google!

I recently came across a podcast where Seth Godin was interviewed. The interviewer asked him what he thought of schools today. I want to share with you my thoughts on one of his replies and how it applies to teaching our children about money. Teach children two things Seth takes the view that schools evolved from the industrial age to teach people how to be compliant. I don’t think there is anything wrong with this. Society definitely has a place
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Subjecting children to voluntary financial discomfort

I read a lot of personal finance blogs. One of my favourite blogs for a long time is Mr Money Mustache. I loved his blog so much that I read every single blog post from the very beginning. Every. Single. Post. This was a few years ago. Recently I thought I might revisit his posts again – from the very beginning. I came across the term ‘voluntary discomfort’ again, but but it resonated more with me this time around. It
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Parents, teach before they are teenagers

When it comes to raising children, parents are always choosing between competing priorities. When our children start school, we prioritise our children’s social skills. We teach them how to interact with other children and make friends at school. As the children progress through primary school, we prioritise our children’s resilience to cope with the demands of school life. We worry about bullying and make sure we expose them to teamwork activities such as team sports, etc. In the final years
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Lesson plans interrupted – 3 options

Sometimes things just don’t work out. The same goes for our lesson plans to cultivate good money habits in our children. Sometimes our plans work, sometimes they don’t. Sometimes our lesson plans work for a while, but then it stops working. So what do we do when things don’t go well? This time, it got in the way of their responsibilities at home. Because of their extra-curricular activities, they were slacking off on their chores, to the extent of not
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Natural saver and natural spender: teaching generosity

In an earlier post I wrote about a person’s natural tendencies. This was based on Gretchen Rubin’s audiobook Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives. Another concept that Gretchen discusses is recognising whether a person as an over-spender or an under-spender.  These concepts are more relevant to adults because we have the money to spend, whereas young children ought to have rules about spending money.  Nevertheless, it got me thinking about whether each of my children is a
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